Power Tools for Technical Communication:
Chapter 12 Quiz


For each of the following questions, select the best answer according to this chapter of Power Tools for Technical Communication, and then press Check answers.

  1. Which of the following best explains the difference between highlighting and emphasis?
    Highlighting is for key words such as not, never, only; emphasis helps readers anticipate how to interpret text (for example, a command or text to enter verbatim).
    Emphasis is for key words such as not, never, only; highlighting helps readers anticipate how to interpret text (for example, a command or text to enter verbatim).
    Highlighting provides a different format to emphasize text (such as indentation or boxes); emphasis uses typographical effects like bold to refer to key words or help readers anticipate how to interpret text.
    Emphasis provides a different format to emphasize text (such as indentation or boxes); highlighting uses typographical effects like bold to refer to key words or help readers anticipate how to interpret text.

  2. Chapter 12 cautions you never to use a certain technique for highlighting and emphasis, even though some writers do use them. Which of the following best states which technique that is and explains why?
    Do not use italics to emphasize words.
    Do not use bold to emphasize words.
    Do not use all-caps to emphasize words.

  3. If you have a situation in which you want to apply highlighting to a full paragraph, which of the following best explains what should you do?
    Go ahead and all-cap the paragraph, but avoiding doing so more than once per page.
    Go ahead and all-cap the paragraph, but do not use bold or italics.
    Select the appropriate type of notice and use the highlighting for the text of that notice.
    Select the appropriate type of notice and use the highlighting only for label of that notice.
    Go ahead and bold the paragraph, but avoiding doing so more than once per page.
    Go ahead and bold the paragraph, but do not use all-caps or italics.
    Go ahead and italicize the paragraph, but do not use all-caps or bold.
    Go ahead and italicize the paragraph, but avoiding doing so more than once per page.

  4. Which of the following best explains when should you use all caps as a method of highlighting or emphasis and why?
    Never: readers feel like they are being screamed at with all-caps text.
    As first choice: readers are much more likely to read all-caps text as opposed to bolded or italicized text.
    In all cases: readers feel like they are being screamed at with bold or italic text.

  5. What is a variable and how should it be highlighted?
    Bold: area on the screen that users click on that causes something to happen in the computer (such as saving a file).
    Initial caps: area on the screen that users click on that causes something to happen in the computer (such as saving a file).
    Italics: text on the screen that stands for something users will enter in place of (for example, your_name).
    Initial caps: text on the screen that stands for something users will enter in place of (for example, your_name).
    Bold: area on the screen that identifies an input area (for example, Your name:).
    Initial caps: area on the screen that identifies an input area (for example, Your name:).

  6. Which of the following best explains what a highlighting scheme is?
    Highlighting system that is too busy, too complicated, and likely to drive readers crazy or cause them not to read the text at all.
    Highlighting system that defines exactly what highlighting is used for exactly which situations.

  7. In word-processing software, which of the following best explains what a character style is and how it can be used to highlight a document?
    A style that applies to individual characters, words, or phrases; you create a character style with a name that describes its function and apply it to bits of text that have that function (such as a command).
    A style that applies to one or more paragraphs; you create a character style with a name that describes its function and apply it to paragraphs that have that function (such as a numbered list).
    A style that applies to individual characters, words, or phrases; you create a character style with a name that describes its function and apply it to paragraphs that have that function (such as a numbered list).
    A style that applies to one or more paragraphs; you create a character style with a name that describes its function and apply it to bits of text that have that function (such as a command).

  8. Which of the following best explains what a field name is and what style of highlighting is recommended for fields by Chapter 12?
    Bold, all caps: area on the screen that users click on that causes something to happen in the computer (such as saving a file).
    Italics, initial caps: area on the screen that users click on that causes something to happen in the computer (such as saving a file).
    Bold, italics: text on the screen that stands for something users will enter in place of (for example, your_name).
    Initial caps, no highlighting: text on the screen that stands for something users will enter in place of (for example, your_name).
    Bold, initial caps: area on the screen that identifies an input area (for example, Your name:).
    Initial caps, no highlighting: area on the screen that identifies an input area (for example, Your name:).

  9. If you are not sure which highlighting to use, which of the following best explains what should you do?
    Use none at all.
    Use italics; it's the most common.
    Use bold; it's the most common.
    Use all-caps; it's the most common.

  10. This chapter states that one form of highlighting is common for examples and user-entered text. Which of the following indicates which it is?
    Courier New
    Arial
    Times New Roman
    Helvetica


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