Power Tools for Technical Communication:
Chapter 10 Quiz


For each of the following questions, select the best answer according to this chapter of Power Tools for Technical Communication, and then press Check answers.

  1. Which of the following best explains the difference between graphs and charts, as presented in Chapter 10?
    Charts use bars or pie slices to show trends or differences; graphs use lines.
    Graphs use bars or pie slices to show trends or differences; charts use lines.
    Charts use rows and columns to show trends or differences; graphs use lines.
    Graphs use rows and columns to show trends or differences; charts use lines.
    Charts use rows and columns to show trends or differences; graphs use bars or pie slices to show trends or differences.
    Graphs use rows and columns to show trends or differences; charts use bars or pie slices to show trends or differences.

  2. If you want readers to get precise data (to the penny, for example), which of the following best explains which to use and why: table, graph, or chart?
    Table: lines show specific data; you use a ruler to calculate against the markers on vertical axis.
    Graph: cells can present data in the most specific manner.
    Chart: bars and pie slices show specific data; you use a ruler or protractor to calculate against the markers on vertical axis or the circle.
    Table: cells can present data in the most specific manner.
    Graph: lines show specific data; you use a ruler to calculate against the markers on vertical axis.
    Chart: bars and pie slices show specific data; you use a ruler or protractor to calculate against the markers on vertical axis or the circle.
    Table: bars and pie slices show specific data; you use a ruler or protractor to calculate against the markers on vertical axis or the circle.
    Graph: lines show specific data; you use a ruler to calculate against the markers on vertical axis.
    Chart: cells can present data in the most specific manner.

  3. If you want readers to get a vivid sense of differences or trends in data, which of the following best explains which to use and why: table, graph, or chart?
    Tables and graphs: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Tables and charts: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Tables: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Tables: you can look at the bars, pie slices, or lines and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Charts and graphs: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Charts and graphs: you can look at the bars, pie slices, or lines and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Graphs: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Graphs: you can look at the bars and pie slices and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Charts: you can look at the numbers in the cells and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.
    Charts: you can look at the lines and quickly get a sense of the trends or key differences.

  4. When you design a table, you can arrange data in columns or rows. To enable readers to compare data on four different products, which of the following does this chapter recommend?
    Note: The textbook is wrong on this item: it states the exact opposite of what is correct. Select the opposite answer from what the textbook says.
    Format so that readers can compare horizontally: for example, enable them to compare the costs of different models by reading left and right across a row of the table.
    Format so that readers can compare vertically: for example, enable them to compare the costs of different models by reading up and down a column of the table.
    Create subrows for the individual comparative categories relating to each item being compared; that way readers can make comparisons by reading vertically.
    Create subcolumns for the individual comparative categories relating to each item being compared; that way readers can make comparisons by reading horizontally.

  5. If each of the numbers in a table column represents a measurement in millimeters, which of the following best explains how you would indicate that fact?
    Put mm after each item in the column.
    Put mm in the column heading.
    Put mm after each item in the row.
    Put mm in the row heading.

  6. Which of the following best explains what this chapter recommends about placing the titles of tables, graphs, and charts?
    Titles are centered beneath tables, charts, and graphs.
    Titles are centered above tables, charts, and graphs.
    Titles are centered beneath tables and are centered above charts and graphs.
    Titles are centered above tables and are centered beneath charts and graphs.

  7. Which of the following best explains what Chapter 10 means when it states that you must label the axes of graphs and charts?
    You must create a sort of key that indicates the meaning of the different shadings, line styles (solid, dashed, etc.) and colors that are used in the graph or chart.
    You must indicate increments on these axes and indicate the value of those increments (years, gallons, temperature, etc.).
    You must indicate the measurement in each row or column (for example, mm, gal, ft, years) rather than in each cell.

  8. Graphs and charts often contain a box that indicates the meanings of different colors, shading, line styles, or textures. What of the following is the name for this box?
    Axis labels
    Row and column headings
    Legend
    Figure title
    Cross-references

  9. When you’ve correctly designed and formatted a table, graph, or chart and placed it at the proper point in text, you must still do two things. Which of the following best explains what those are?
    Refer to it by number or title from the text just preceding it, and briefly explain its significance.
    Refer to it by number or title from the text just following it, and briefly explain its significance.
    Label the axes and add a figure title.

  10. Most word-processing and desktop-publishing software enables you to create graphs or charts. Which of the following best explains how you create graphs and charts for web pages?
    You enter special HTML tagging that a web browser can then display as a graph or chart.
    You cannot display graphs and charts on web pages.
    You create the graph or chart in something like Lotus 123 or MS Excel, copy it, then convert it to a GIF.


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