Business & Technical Communications: Quiz on Headings

Answer the questions in this quiz to see how well you've read and understood the chapter headings. Feel free to link back and forth between the chapter on headings and this quiz to check your answers.

When you're through, just click on Check answers to check your answers.

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  1. Which of the following best defines the term heading as it used in this chapter?
    The book, part, chapter, or section name that you see along the very top or bottom edge of each page in a book.
    Titles of illustrations, diagrams, photographs, charts, graphs, and tables (located beneath all of the preceding except for tables, in which case they are located above).
    Titles and subtitles inserted right into the body text of a document indicating topics and subtopics about to be discussed.

  2. Which of the following best explains what it means for one heading to be subordinate to another?
    Some sections are actually parts of a larger section, in which case they are "subsections." The headings used for those subsections would be "subordinate" to the heading for the larger section.
    Some sections contain smaller subsections. The heading used for this higher-level section (which contains the subsections and their subheadings) is "subordinate" to the headings for the subsections.
    Some sections are at the same level in a document and therefore are "subordinate" to each other. In an outline view, they'd both use roman numerals; or they'd both use capital letters; or they'd both use arabic numerals; and so on.

  3. Which of the following best describes stacked headings as the term is used in this chapter?
    Two consecutive headings without any intervening text.
    A single heading all by itself within a section; a heading without a companion at its same level within the same section.
    Two consecutive headings that have very little text between them (for example, just a sentence).
    Too many headings within a section; headings that are jammed together at the same level within the same section.

  4. Which of the following best describes lone headings as the term is used in this chapter?
    Two consecutive headings without any intervening text.
    A single heading all by itself within a section; a heading without a companion at its same level within the same section.
    Two consecutive headings that have very little text between them (for example, just a sentence).
    Too many headings within a section; headings that are jammed together at the same level within the same section.

  5. Which of the following best explains what are task-oriented headings (which are commonly used in instructions)?
    Nouns that indicate the topic of the section such as "Background," "Process," or "Measurements."
    Phrasing (such as nouns) that indicates the level of a heading—in other words, whether a heading is subordinate to a preceding or following heading.
    Phrasing that indicates the procedure to be performed such as "Installing the Software" or "How to Calibrate the Glucose Meter."

  6. Which of the following best explains what it means for headings to be parallel in phrasing and provides the best example?
    Headings at the same level within the same section must be about the same length: Installing the Software, How to Configure the Software
    Headings at the same level within the same section must use the same style of wording: Installing the Software, How to Configure the Software
    Headings at the same level within the same section must be about the same length: Installing the Software, Configuring the Software
    Headings at the same level within the same section must use the same style of wording: Installing the Software, Configuring the Software

  7. Imagine that you have the following situation: you have a chapter of a report that provides background on insects that can attack vegetable gardens in the Midwest. Which of the following is the best heading that gives as complete an idea of that section without becoming overly long?
    Background
    Insects
    The Midwest
    Background on Insects
    Background on the Midwest
    Background on Insects of the Midwest
    Gardens
    Vegetables
    Vegetable Gardens
    Gardens of the Midwest
    Vegetables of the Midwest
    Vegetable Gardens of the Midwest
    Midwest Vegetable Gardens and Insects: Background
    The Insects of the Midwest That Attack Vegetable Gardens: Background
    Background on the Insects of the Midwest That Attack Vegetable Gardens
    Background on Midwest Vegetable Gardens and the Insects That Attack Them
    Background on Insects of the Midwest That Attack Vegetable Gardens
    The Attack of the Killer Insects: Report from the Frontlines of the Gardens in the Midwest

  8. Which of the following best explains what it means that headings can have different levels?
    Just as an outline has roman-numeral sections, capital-letter sections, and arabic-numeral sections, so does the text have sections that are different levels corresponding to the outline. Headings must be designed to indicate these levels.
    Like special notices (used for danger, caution, and warning situations), headings also indicate a level of severity or importance. Headings must be designed so that they indicate these different levels of severity or importance.
    Headings can be designed for different levels of readers: for example, high-level headings for experts and technicians; medium-level headings for executive readers; and low-level headings for nonspecialist and casual readers.

  9. Which of the following best describes the difference between items in an outline and headings in a corresponding text?
    Outline items include roman and arabic numerals as well as upper- and lowercase letters and sometimes lowercase roman numerals. Headings generally do not.
    Headings include roman and arabic numerals as well as upper- and lowercase letters and sometimes lowercase roman numerals. Outline items generally do not.

  10. Which of the following best explains how you design headings so that they indicate different levels?
    Use outline elements such as roman and arabic numerals as well as upper- and lowercase letters and sometimes lowercase roman numerals to indicate the levels of the corresponding sections those headings introduce.
    Use different colors or icons to indicate the levels of the corresponding sections those headings introduce.
    Use different fonts, type sizes, bold and italics, and alignment to indicate heading levels.

   

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