Business & Technical Communications:
Quiz on Proposals

Answer the questions in this quiz to see how well you've read and understood the chapter. Feel free to link back and forth between the chapter on proposals and this quiz to check your answers.

When you're through, just click on Check answers to check your answers.

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  1. In terms of our technical-writing course, the most important thing about the proposal is which of the following:
    It proposes to write the technical report that you planned to write in a previous unit.
    It provides information about the progress you've made on a project you are doing for a client.
    It includes a mini-resume—your qualifications for doing the project.
  2. Which of the following is the best definition of the proposal, according to how it is defined in the textbook?
    A document that describes an innovation that will provide increased productivity or a solution to a problem and then discusses the costs and benefits of doing such a project.
    A document that describes an ongoing project, the situation that the project addresses, the work that has been done to date on the project, the work remaining to be done, and any problems that have come up during the project.
    A document that offers or requests to do a project, explains the method and schedule by which it will done, breaks out the cost for doing the project, explains the benefits of doing the project, and states the writer's qualifications.
  3. Study the following descriptions of writing projects, and determine whether each is a proposal according to the definition of proposals in the textbook.

  4. A document that explains how to disassemble, clean, and reassemble a U.S. Army P1265-A rifle according to strict military regulations—for use by drill instructors in training camp.
    That is a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
    That's not a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
  5. Addressed to city planners, a document that offers to study whether free bus transportation in the city would increase ridership and decrease traffic congestion and that reports the data, conclusions, and recommendations.
    That is a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
    That's not a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
  6. Addressed to city planners, a document that discusses whether free bus transportation in the city would increase ridership and decrease traffic congestion and that then presents the data, conclusions, and recommendations.
    That is a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
    That's not a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
  7. A request for approval and funding to write a simplified guide on how to use the basic functions of LOTUS 1-2-3 for new clerical staff at Smith Account Processing, Inc., who need help learning and using the program.
    That is a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
    That's not a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
  8. A document that functions as a simplified guide on how to use the basic functions of LOTUS 1-2-3. It is used by new clerical staff at Smith Account Processing, Inc., who need help learning and using the program.
    That is a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
    That's not a proposal, according to the definition in our textbook.
  9. In a proposal, it's important to include certain sections and to get them in the right sequence. Based on your reading of the textbook, which of the following is the best structure (contents and organization) for a proposal?
    Introduction, background on the situation, brief description of the proposed project, benefits of doing the project, description of the project results, procedure for doing the project, schedule for the project, proposer's qualifications, costs for doing the project, and conclusion.
    Introduction, background on the situation, costs for doing the project, brief description of the proposed project, benefits of doing the project, description of the project results, procedure for doing the project, schedule for the project, proposer's qualifications, and conclusion.
    Introduction, background on the situation, brief description of the proposed project, benefits of doing the project, description of the project results, procedure for doing the project, schedule for the project, costs for doing the project, and conclusion.
    Introduction, benefits of doing the project, description of the project results, procedure for doing the project, schedule for the project, costs for doing the project, feasibility of the project, and conclusion.
  10. Which of the following use the correct type of proposal and the correct format for a proposal? (More than one may be correct.)
    You write an "external" proposal to your supervisor using the business-letter format.
    You write an "internal" proposal to your supervisor using the memorandum format.
    You write an "external" proposal to a client using the business-letter format.
    You write an "internal" proposal to a client using the memorandum format.
    You write an "external" proposal to your supervisor using the memorandum format.
    You write an "internal" proposal to your supervisor using the business-letter format.
    You write an "external" proposal to a client using the memorandum format.
    You write an "internal" proposal to a client using the business-letter format.
  11. Click on each of the following that is a section typically found in proposals that section:
    Introduction—indicates the purpose of the document (the proposal), mentions some prior contact, and gives an overview of the contents of the proposal.
    Background on the situation—describes the problem that the proposed project is an effort to solve or address in some way.
    Work completed—describes the work that has been completed for the project.
    Benefits and feasibility—discusses the benefits of doing the project and the feasibility of its success.
    Inquiry—the section on which the proposer inquires whether the recipient has any projects that need action.
    Project results—an objective description or explanation of exactly what the project will achieve (for example, a completed construction, a finished report, or a completed seminar).
    Conclusions and recommendations—a section that states the conclusions reached during the study and then states the recommendations that can be made based on those conclusions.
    Schedule and costs—a list of dates for milestones of the proposed project, and a table of costs for doing the project.
    Data—the various kinds of data gathered during the research (such as statistics, survey results, observations).
    Qualifications—the writer's background that qualifies her or him for doing the proposed work.

   

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