Technical Writing 101: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz

Answer the questions in this quiz to see how well you've read and understood the chapter. Feel free to look up answers in the book and retake this quiz until you get all the answers right.

This quiz is based on Technical Writing 101: A Real-World Guide to Planning and Writing Technical Content, Alan Pringle & Sara O'Keefe, Kindle edition. ASIN B004NEW1M4.

When you're through, just click on Check answers to check your answers. If you want to start over, just click on Clear & restart.

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  1. If you have explained the actions that the user takes, provided graphics to illustrate that action, and included any necessary notes, cautions, warnings, or dangers, what is left to do, according to this chapter?
    That's it; you're done.
    Describe the results of those actions.
    Explain variations on the way the user can perform the actions.
    Introduce the next action, explaining how it relates to the current action.
  2. What is the major difference between how this chapter defines notes, cautions, and warnings and how the online textbook defines them?
    The online textbook defines warnings as potential injury, while this chapter defines warnings as potential damage to equipment or data.
    The online textbook defines cautions as potential damage to equipment or data, while this chapter defines cautions as potential injury.
    The online textbook defines warnings as potential damage to equipment or data, while this chapter defines warnings as potential injury.
    The online textbook defines cautions as potential injury, while this chapter defines cautions as potential damage to equipment or data.
  3. What does this chapter say is wrong with this example: The Master Page Usage dialog box is displayed.
    It is not a user step, not something a user actually performs.
    It should use the bulleted-list format; it is not in any necessary order.
    It should use task-oriented phrasing.
    It is too wordy.
  4. What does this chapter say is wrong with the example in the set that starts with To print a file, follow these steps
    The first two examples are grammatically incomplete.
    The last example is too wordy.
    The last example does not follow the grammatical pattern of the first two.
    The first two examples do not follow the grammatical pattern of the last example.
  5. Which of the following best defines writing with the task-oriented approach?
    Focuses on the actions that users want to perform.
    Focuses on the functions that are built into a product.
    Focuses on the tasks that the writer must perform to get ready to write about a product.
    Focuses on the results of the actions that users perform.

     

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