Technical Editing:
Editing: The Big Picture — Rude 1

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This quiz is based on Technical Editing (4th ed.) by Carolyn Rude. If you find any questions not addressed in the 4th edition, contact your instructor.

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  1. Which of the following states the most important, most fundamental function of the editor in the context of this chapter?
    Contributing to the development of documents that work for the people who use them.
    Contributing to the technical accuracy and completeness of the documents that support a product library.
    Ensuring correct grammar, usage, punctuation as well as consistency in areas such as numbers, capitalization, symbols, abbreviations, and highlighting.
    Determining the documents to be included in the product library as well as their appropriate content, organization, and delivery media; and then distributing these specifications to writers.
  2. Which of the following statements is not reflective of the comprehensive role of a technical editor?
    Proofreading copy for typos, misspellings, and grammar mistakes that have been corrected
    Helping to define the need, purpose, and scope of a document.
    Working with subject matter experts to gather technical information for the writer.
    Reviewing text for completeness, accuracy, visual design, and overall effectiveness.
  3. What is the purpose of multiple reviews of a document?
    To achieve a good balance between the technical and stylistic point of view.
    To ensure that the technical language is correct.
    To ensure that the style is appropriate for the audience.
    To achieve technical accuracy and effective writing.
  4. Which is not a responsibility of a technical editor?
    Learning about the product or the technology.
    Drafting specifications for the final documentation project.
    Drafting a style sheet.
    Developing templates for programming scripts.
  5. The editors described in this chapter are concerned with content, organization, style, design, usability, and correctness of grammar and spelling. This kind of editing is called:
    Copyediting
    Proof reading
    Managed editing
    Comprehensive editing
  6. Which is not a basic copyediting function?
    Checking for spelling.
    Ensuring the document's usability.
    Correcting grammar errors.
    Ensuring consistency in document style and format.
  7. In the development of some technical documents, repesentative users are observed in their efforts to perform tasks in those documents. What is the term for that process?
    Version control
    Desktop publishing
    Usability testing
    Substantive editing
  8. In the development of some technical documents, subject matter experts such as hardware and software engineers or medical researchers, review those documents for technical accuracy and completeness. What is the term for that process?
    Technical review
    Usability testing
    Version control
    Documentation sign-off
  9. Which of the following best explains what is "technical" about technical editing?
    Technical editors are subject matter experts in relation to the documents they edit.
    Technical editors work on documents that have technical subjects and may have limited technical knowledge.
    Technical editors work on documents that have technical subjects and are subject matter experts in relation to those documents.
    Technical editors develop documents using sophisticated desktop-publishing software.
  10. Which of the following best makes the distinction between comprehensive editing and basic copyediting?
    The former focuses on issues such as grammar, punctuation, usage, and consistency; the latter, on issues such as document audiences, purposes, content, organization, and comprehension.
    The former focuses on issues such as grammar, punctuation, usage, and consistency; the latter, on a document's technical completeness and accuracy.
    The former focuses on issues such as document audiences, purposes, content, organization, and comprehension; the latter, on issues such as grammar, punctuation, usage, and consistency.
    The former focuses on issues such as document audiences, purposes, content, organization, and comprehension; the latter, on a document's technical completeness and accuracy.
    The former focuses on a document's technical completeness and accuracy; the latter, on issues such as document audiences, purposes, content, organization, and comprehension.
    The former focuses on a document's technical completeness and accuracy; the latter, on issues such as grammar, punctuation, usage, and consistency.


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