Basic Page-Design Quiz

Answer the questions in this quiz to see how well you've read and understood the chapter. Feel free to look up answers in the book and retake this quiz until you get all the answers right.

This quiz is based on the page-design basics chapter in the Online Textbook.

When you're through, just click on Check answers to check your answers. If you want to start over, just click on Clear & restart.

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  1. One of the common problems with headings involves having two or more headings consecutively without intervening text. Which of the following is the name of that problem?
    Stacked headings
    Lone headings
    Lack of parallelism
  2. Another heading problem occurs when you have a single heading within a section without a companion at the same level in the same section. What's that problem called?
    Stacked headings
    Lone headings
    Lack of parallelism
    Pronoun-reference problem
  3. In the chapter on which this quiz is based, what's the general name for the use of bold, italics, underscores, alternate color, alternate font?
    Highlighting
    Emphasis
    Notices
    Typography
  4. Which of the following explains what's wrong with using all caps, bold, italics, and underscores to ensure that readers notice something in your text?
    There is nothing wrong with such combinations—they are marks of good page design. They create a lively, more attractive looking page and ensure readers will see important information.
    Such combinations should not be used because they are inefficient in terms of the technical writer's time. The business of technical writing involves knowing how to streamline the process while maintaining reasonable quality.
    They are redundant forms of emphasis—one form of emphasis is enough. Additional ones just create an overly busy-looking text no one want to read.
  5. What's the maximum amount of text you should highlight (using bold, italic, color, etc.)?
    No more than a word
    No more than a sentence
    No more than a paragraph
    There is no practice limit to how much you should highlight—whatever the situation calls for.
  6. If you have a full paragraph that you want to highlight—because you want to make sure readers see it—what should you do?
    Use all caps.
    Use all bold.
    Format the text as a special notice (danger, warning, caution, note, etc.)
    Format the text as a list (numbered, bulleted, two-column, nested, or in-sentence).
    Use some combination of bold, italics, larger type size, alternate, and, if possible, vivid color.
  7. The chapter discusses two basic kinds of vertical lists—bulleted and numbered. What's the difference in their usage?
    Use bulleted lists if you want extra emphasis on the items; otherwise, use numbers.
    Use numbered lists if you want extra emphasis on the items; otherwise, use bullets.
    Use numbered lists for items in no necessary order; bulleted lists, for items in a required order.
    Use bulleted lists for items in no necessary order; numbered lists, for items in a required order.
  8. According to the chapter, how should you introduce lists?
    Use headings punctuated with colons.
    Use headings or sentences punctuated with colons.
    Use sentences punctuated with colons.
    Use headings or sentences only if the list needs to be defined.
  9. According to the chapter, how should you align columns of text (several words up to a sentence) in a table and their headings?
    Left-align both the text and the column headings.
    Right-align both the text and the column headings.
    Center both the text and the column headings.
    Left-align both the text but center the column headings.
  10. The chapter discusses a special formatting technique for information you want to ensure that readers see—especially for alerting readers to potential injury or damages. What are those techniques called in this chapter?
    Highlighting and special emphasis techniques
    Special notices
    Glossaries
    Vertical lists

   

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