Technical Communication:
Glossary Guidelines (Read Me First! 17)


Answer the questions in this quiz to see how well you've read and understood the chapter. Feel free to look up answers in the book and retake this quiz until you get all the answers right.

This quiz is based on Read Me First! A Style Guide for the Computer Industry by Sun Technical Publications, 3rd ed.

When you're through, just click on Check answers to check your answers. If you want to start over, just click on Clear & restart.

Your name Your handle (use the exact same handle
you created in the questionnaire)
Your e-mail (if you want your
results e-mailed to you)

  1. This chapter recommends that you italicize new terms—but when, in what circumstances?
    At the point in the text where the term is defined.
    If the term is included in the glossary.
    At the point in the text where the term is defined, and if the term is included in the glossary.
    For all occurrences of the term.

  2. If you are defining a verb in a glossary, which of the following identifies the type of phrasing you should use and shows a good example?
    Infinitive: (v.) To click twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Infinitive: (n.) An input method in which the user clicks twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Infinitive: (v.) An input method in which the user clicks twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Infinitive: (n.) To click twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Noun phrase: (n.) To click twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Noun phrase: (v.) An input method in which the user clicks twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Noun phrase: (n.) An input method in which the user clicks twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.
    Noun phrase: (v.) To click twice in rapid succession without moving the mouse.

  3. When you include an acronym in a glossary, what should you do at the very minimum according to this chapter?
    Place the expansion according to where it would go alphabetically, and include the acronym in parentheses after it.
    Place the acronym according to where it would go alphabetically, and include the expansion in parentheses after it.
    Do not place acronyms or their expansions in a glossary.

  4. Imagine that you want to include "floppy disk" in your glossary, but point from that term to your preferred term "diskette." Which do you use?
    See diskette.
    See floppy disk.
    See also diskette.
    See also floppy disk.

  5. Imagine that you want to include "GIF graphic format" in your glossary, but point from that term to a closely related term "JPEG graphic format." Which do you use?
    See JPEG graphic format.
    See also JPEG graphic format.
    See GIF graphic format.
    See also GIF graphic format.

  6. See also references do which of the following?
    Point to a prerequisite term.
    Point to a more detailed technical term.
    Point to a preferred term.
    Point to a closely related term.

  7. See references do which of the following?
    Point to a prerequisite term.
    Point to a more detailed technical term.
    Point to a preferred term.
    Point to a closely related term.

  8. When should you include a glossary?
    When your document is over 20 pages.
    When your document focuses on a new technology and readers are likely to be unfamiliar with that technology.
    When your document focuses on an existing technology and readers are likely to be familiar with that technology.
    When you want to enable readers to find discussion of key topics in the body of the document quickly.

  9. What's wrong with the following glossary entry: shell procedure. (n.) A shell procedure is an executable file that is not a compiled program. ?
    The part of speech is not indicated.
    The part of speech that is indicated is wrong.
    The definition repeats the glossary term.
    Nothing! It's fine—leave it alone.

  10. Which of the following identifies the format that should be used for glossaries?
    Two column: term in bold and initial cap in the left margin; the definition in the right column.
    Two column: term in bold and lowercase (unless it's a proper noun) in the left margin; the definition in the right column.
    Run-in format: the term (lowercased unless a proper noun) "run in to" the definition.
    Run-in format: the term (using an initial cap on the first word) "run in to" the definition.
    No format (two-column, run-in, other) is recommended; no cap style is recommended.



Information and programs by hcexres@prismnet.com.